Thought Processes and Stormy Waves

Thought Processes and Stormy Waves

The past year has been a very challenging one for almost everyone. It was a season of never-before-seen happenings and brand-new challenges. Many of us found ourselves trapped in a change of mindset- pondering over negative thoughts and negative outcomes. Having a lot of time in my hand to simply sit and think about many things, I too, saw myself giving in to this habit of thinking negatively.  It’s not like I was broken emotionally, but I saw myself drifting in my thought processes to unnecessarily worrying scenarios and thoughts.

Until one night as I was going to sleep, I started introspecting. I realized just how far I had drifted away from the person I used to be before the Pandemic. But in the midst of all this, there were moments where God would speak to me in different ways, and one day this scripture really spoke a whole new life into me.

Mathew 14:22 Immediately after this, Jesus insisted that his disciples get back into the boat and cross to the other side of the lake, while he sent the people home. 23 After sending them home, he went up into the hills by himself to pray. Night fell while he was there alone. 24 Meanwhile, the disciples were in trouble far away from land, for a strong wind had risen, and they were fighting heavy waves. 25 About three o’clock in the morning Jesus came toward them, walking on the water. 26 When the disciples saw him walking on the water, they were terrified. In their fear, they cried out, “It’s a ghost!” 27 But Jesus spoke to them at once. “Don’t be afraid,” he said. “Take courage. I am here!”28 Then Peter called to him, “Lord, if it’s really you, tell me to come to you, walking on the water.”

29 “Yes, come,” Jesus said. So Peter went over the side of the boat and walked on the water toward Jesus. 30 But when he saw the strong wind and the waves, he was terrified and began to sink. “Save me, Lord!” he shouted.

31 Jesus immediately reached out and grabbed him. “You have so little faith,” Jesus said. “Why did you doubt me?” 32 When they climbed back into the boat, the wind stopped. 33 Then the disciples worshiped him. “You really are the Son of God!” they exclaimed

We see that Peter, upon being called, stepped onto the waters, but soon enough, he lost his focus on Jesus and so, he got overwhelmed by the surroundings. I want to let each and everyone reading this know that we ALL are called to walk upon waters. Yet, how many of us have shifted our focus in the past year? There are moments where we see things around us go for a toss, but the real problem begins when we react to it and lose our focus on Jesus. I encourage you all that in every season of your life, keep Jesus at the center. Every season may not be easy, but as long as you have Jesus as your focus point, you will walk upon stormy waves and high waters.

This blog written by our dear Melrick Stephen Pinto, is the second in a series of blogs written by the leaders of House of Healing Ministries. The series titled ‘Lessons in a Lockdown’ will carry the stories, thoughts, and experiences of our leaders in the past one and half years as they navigated the new normal with Jesus. Stay tuned for our next ‘Lesson in a Lockdown.’

Cornelius meets Peter

Cornelius meets Peter

At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment. He and all his family were devout and God-fearing; he gave generously to those in need and prayed to God regularly. One day at about three in the afternoon he had a vision. He distinctly saw an angel of God, who came to him and said, “Cornelius!”- Acts 10:1-3

At a recent Christian conference, I met a missionary, who has been working with the refugees from the conflict areas of the Middle-East. He shared accounts of many refugees from other faiths, approaching him with accounts of visions and dreams of Jesus Christ and asking him to tell them more about Jesus. One day, such a young man approached him and asked about Jesus and the shaken missionary shared the Gospel with him. The next day, the young man brought 25 other young men to him and they all heard the gospel again and they asked him to pray for them. This is not an isolated incident. Hundreds are getting baptized there daily. The light of God is almost always most visible to those who are suffering in abject darkness.

Cornelius prayed. From the biblical account we know that He and his family were devout and God fearing. Yet he hadn’t heard about Christ. An angel visited him not to convert him but to direct him to Apostle Peter.

“The angel answered, “…Now send men to Joppa to bring back a man named Simon who is called Peter. He is staying with Simon the tanner, whose house is by the sea.”- Acts 10:6

God gave Cornelius a supernatural encounter but gave the assignment of sharing the gospel to Apostle Peter. One man’s encounter lead to the transformation of all Gentiles. The bible tells us that Cornelius was expecting Peter and had called together his relatives and close friends. When Peter went inside Cornelius’s home, he found a large gathering of people. 

Not only was Cornelius a man of prayer, but his family also sought God with him. When Cornelius received a response from God, he didn’t hesitate. He stepped out and obeyed. Even before becoming a Christian he became a missionary by gathering his folks at his home to hear from Apostle Peter.

For the gentiles, the receiving of the gospel began with one man seeking and praying with his family for God. It began with one man willing to open his heart, his family and his home to be blessed by the Gospel of Christ and then readily share that blessing with his friends and relatives. This very event is going on right now in the Middle East. If it can happen in a war zone, it can happen anywhere. Even in your own city.

This blog is just a reminder to us that God hasn’t changed. He is still reaching out to the lost sheep. He is very busy connecting sheep to shepherds. People are searching for God amidst the shattered remains of their abusive homes, broken economies, unravelling social morality and war torn nations. Are the shepherds ready? Are you ready to live lives worthy of the calling that Peter received one afternoon at the tanner’s house?

It’s not about us anymore it’s about millions of people whose cries and petitions are before the Lord. Let us send our prayers before God, share in His burden for the people, answer when He calls and not allow convenience to prevent obedience.

The Syrophenician Woman- A New Testament Shadow to the Gentiles

The Syrophenician Woman- A New Testament Shadow to the Gentiles

An unnamed woman gets introduced in the gospel of Mathew 15 and again in Mark 7. St. Mathew calls her a Canaanite woman and St. Mark attributes her as a Syrophenician Greek. Jesus compares her to a dog.

“And behold, a Canaanite woman from that region came out and was crying, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David; my daughter is severely oppressed by a demon.” But He did not answer her a word. And His disciples came and begged him, saying, “Send her away, for she is crying out after us.”- Mathew 15:22,23

I feel almost embarrassed to see how Jesus behaves with this woman who is clearly suffering. He says He has been sent only for the lost sheep of Israel. His demeanor shows He isn’t available for or interested in helping her. His response to her request was first silence and then an excuse. Neither of which inspires confidence, much less worship.

And yet this is her response.
“Then she came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, help me!” –Mathew 15:25

Jesus was getting closer to his betrayal, suffering, and death on the cross. In a little while, He was about to die for this very woman and the rest of the world. His sacrifice was about to rip away the veil that separated God and man. So why did he treat her so poorly?

“It is not good to take the children’s bread and throw it to the little dogs.”

This interaction would mostly leave me with an impression of an unfair God. In her place, my response would have probably been to raise accusations against the indifferent God of the Jews.
But then she said,
“Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters’ table.” Then Jesus answered her, “O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you desire.” And her daughter was healed instantly.
I can’t tell exactly why Jesus behaved this way. But the account leaves me with a sense of marvel at the concept of faith according to Jesus as expressed here.
What was her faith? When Jesus confronted her with her inadequacy in receiving anything from Him, she did not respond with blame or disappointment with God. She did not grumble as Israel did in the wilderness. She did not walk away. She held on to one thing- the goodness of God.
Her response acknowledged that she was not worthy of help. She didn’t have the right to receive. She accepted that the salvation came for the chosen people, God’s elect, the seed of Abraham but she held on to the overflow of grace that the Jews received and she staked her claim to partake of it.
All salvation is salvation through God’s covenant with Abraham. It traces back to Genesis when God makes a covenant with Abraham saying “And in you, all the families of the earth shall be blessed.” (Genesis 12.3)
Her argument here is simply one of humility, perseverance, and truth. Yes, I am an unworthy foreigner. But Your grace abounds toward Israel and through Your promise of salvation for them, I receive salvation by faith. She didn’t question his goodness and his grace but instead, she depended on it.
A test of faith often brings us to our knees admitting our lack of credentials but also gives us an opportunity to express our steady confidence in the promise God has extended to us. When I look at this incident, I see God working in her to establish a new shadow for all the believers that come after her. I am able to see not an unfair God but a God working to reveal His heart to us through faith and actions of people like this gentile woman, encouraging us to trust in Him, to be humble before Him and to believe in His goodness especially when our faith is tested.